Review Roundup - April 3

Category:  The Arts
Saturday, April 6th, 2019 at 12:30 PM

P!nk - "Hustle"

“Hustle” by P!nk is most definitely a motivational song. Count this writer as one who’ll use it anytime they need to get pumped up. The song starts off with a strong beat, with P!nk then coming in with her powerful vocals to accompany it.  

“Hustle’s” chorus gives off the same vibe as “So What,” which contrasts slower verses with the hook. The chorus starts with: “So don’t hustle me (whoop, whoop)/ Don’t hustle me (whoop, whoop),” and it will be stuck in your head for days to come. The beat makes the song something that you immediately want to jam out to, and the choir that joins P!nk in the chorus brings even more life to it.  

While P!nk’s first single, “Walk Me Home,” is a slower and more emotional song, “Hustle” takes on a similar topic, but in a way that makes you want to move around and jam. “Walk Me Home” is more designed to sing along to and later contemplate. The verses talk about a man underestimating P!nk because she loved him. Both songs will be on P!nk’s upcoming album: “Hurts 2B Human.”  

 

8/10 

Erica Burkholder | edinboro.spectator@gmail.com

 

 

Aly & AJ - "Church

“Church” is much different than the Aly & AJ of my childhood, a duo that first struck gold with their cover of “Do You Believe in Magic?”  

The overdone and dramatic pop sound that I grew up listening to has changed into a much tamer version of the genre. “Church” brings more harmony and hymn than most pop today, though it does share traits with the softer, slower pop songs currently on the charts.   

The pre-chorus, “I need redemption/For sins I can’t mention” stands out as not only the most attention-getting line in the song, but the backing music calms down the most during this moment. The music also slows down in the chorus, bringing in new instrumentals until the bridge slows down like a ballad. The shifts in the music help separate the chorus and verses, giving different feelings to different parts of the track.  

The song explores the idea of living your life how you want to, but also realizing that, depending on your religion, you may feel guilty about it. This is shown in the lyrics: “I do bad things for the sake of good times” and “For all the places where it hurts/I need a lil church.” The overall idea the song leaves you with is that church is there for you when you need it, but sometimes life contradicts your religion. 

 

6/10 

Erica Burkholder| eidnboro.spectator@gmail.com

 

 

Billie Eilish - "WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?"

Have you ever accidentally stumbled upon an artist and then absolutely loved all of their music? Yeah, that’s me with Billie Eilish. Last summer I discovered her song ‘Ocean Eyes’ and it was the song of my summer. Besides singles and an EP, Eilish had not released an album until now.  

Now here we are in March of 2019 and Eilish has released, “WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?” and to no surprise, I am a fan. 

Billie Eilish is one of those artists that no matter what genre you claim to be a fan of, if you stumble upon one of her songs, you’ll still think it was a good song. Whether this be for the artist’s deep lyrics, sweet and soothing voice or her various creative stylistic choices – you’re sure to find something you like about her music. 

The album opens with a studio clip recording !!!!!!! a 14 second clip of Eilish in the studio taking out her Invisalign. It’s a perfect example of her creative stylistic choices right off the bat. Throughout the album, Eilish keeps it up with these stylistic choices, switching up the different sounds and moods of each song throughout. 

This is exemplified in songs such as you should see me in a crown where Eilish takes on darker sounding tones and moods. Whereas in songs such as wish you were gay,” when the party’s over and ilomilo,” Eilish takes on more pop and soft sounding stylistic choices. 

The song 8 takes on a new meaning of creativity. The beginning of the song opens with a sweet melody sung by Eilish, but uses the studio to her advantage as she modulates her voice throughout the song to give it more layers, sometimes starting a verse with the modulated voice and quickly spiking back to her natural voice. 

One the songs that most stood out on the album was my strange addiction where Eilish samples clips from “The Office” to start off the track and throughout the entirety of it. The song also features on of my personal favorite lines of the album, “Shoulda took a break, not an Oxford comma.” 

About a month ago, I was doing some work and had Spotify on in the background (this is where I admit I don’t have Spotify premium.) An ad came on for Eilish’s bury a friend. Naturally, I clicked on it to follow whatever music path that this song was about to lead me down. This is where I quickly found out that bury a friend takes a darker path. It’s one of those songs on the album where I can listen to it over and over and never get tired of it. 

Towards the end of the soundtrack, Eilish takes on softer and deeper sounds. listen before I go hits hard with its lyrics, “if you need me/you wanna see me/you better hurry/ ‘cause I’m leaving soon.” The song ends with audio clips of sirens in the distance and quiet screams. 

The album closes out with goodbye,” which contains a somber sounding melody with lyrics from the album riddled throughout. The song is a bittersweet ending to the album, as it is so beautiful that it makes you want to hear more, but when the 1 minute 59 second song is over, the album is as well. It’s almost as if you have to go back through to hear it all again. 

I’m not sure if it’s for Eilish’s sweet sounding vocals, musical choices, her lack of capitalization, her lyrics or a combination of it all, but overall, I’m in love with this album. 

  

Standout tracks: when the party’s over,” bury a friend,” goodbye & “my strange addiction.”  

Rate: 9/10 

Madi Gross | edinboro.spectator@gmail.com

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